the ‘-’ in ‘uh-oh’

Doing that ling thing to get the ling bling.

Sep 21

hello, yes, i would like my official job title to be morpheme master.


wintruz-windaz:

The “c” was added in words like “scent,” “science,” etc., to make them more like Latin words like “scissor” (which is spelled that way because its pre-Latin roots were pronounced with a hard “k” sound), mostly in the 1600’s.  It was originally spelled without the “c.”

So that’s my case for regarding the “c” as the silent letter in “scent.”


Sep 16

Teenagers are literally just tryna be trendy and follow historical patterns of language change, but prescriptivists think they’re dumb and don’t want to give them jobs

lolmythesis:

English language and literature, University of South Carolina

"Literally" speaking: Youth language, prescriptivism, and ideology


The ubiquitous forms of address for women ‘Mrs’ and ‘Miss’ are both abbreviations of ‘mistress’. Although mistress is a term with a multiplicity of meanings, in early modern England the mistress most commonly designated the female equivalent of master–that is, a person with capital who directed servants or apprentices.

Prior to the mid eighteenth century, there was only Mrs (or Mris, Ms, or other forms of abbreviation). Mrs was applied to any adult woman who merited the social distinction, without any marital connotation. Miss was reserved for young girls until the mid eighteenth century. Even when adult single women started to use Miss, Mrs still designated a social or business standing, and not the status of being married, until at least the mid nineteenth century.

This article demonstrates the changes in nomenclature over time, explains why Mrs was never used to accord older single women the same status as a married woman, and argues that the distinctions are important to economic and social historians.

Abstract from Mistresses and Marriage: or, a Short History of the Mrs, also known as the most interesting article I’ve read all day.

Full text is available here, but if you remember one thing, how about that Jane Austen in 1811 is the earliest citation that the author can find for the “Mrs Man” form, e.g. “Mrs John Dashwood”? 

(via allthingslinguistic)


Sep 11

andbrittlebones:

glottalplosive:

so i read a review of steven pinker’s style guide book, and apparently it’s still very prescriptivist even though pinker talks about how he is a descriptivist.

like pinker supports distinguishing between who and whom and is against singular data.

ok.

"I’m a descriptivist except I support obsolete and pedantic prescriptivist rules that no one except obsolete and pedantic humans use"


so i read a review of steven pinker’s style guide book, and apparently it’s still very prescriptivist even though pinker talks about how he is a descriptivist.

like pinker supports distinguishing between who and whom and is against singular data.

ok.


Sep 4

andbrittlebones:

My favourite translator said that when she was an ambassador for Hungary she took all these Japanese politicians on a tour and she was trying to circumtranslate ‘merry go round’ cause she didn’t know the Japanese word for it by calling it a ‘horse tornado for children’ and they had no blessed idea what she was saying and she finally started running in circles going up and down and they go ‘ohhhhh, in Japan we call those ‘merry-go-rounds’”

(via didyoudrinkmygingerale)


“I want to be a famous enough linguist Noam Comsky considers me one of his enemies.” overheard

Sep 2

If the G in gnat is silent, and the H in honest is silent, and the O in people is silent, and the T in castle is silent, and the I in juice is silent,

maybe you should be silent and stop spreading misconceptions about graphotactics.


french-verbz:

"Learning a foreign language is cultural appropriation." says the English speakers for whom most of the world’s media content is available in their native language and have never been in a situation where their safety or ability to communicate has been compromised due to language barriers.

(via didyoudrinkmygingerale)


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